Rain pushed south of FLX while heat builds

High pressure situated north of the Finger Lakes will keep rain to the south Wednesday before transporting hot, summery air north for the end of the week.
High pressure situated north of the Finger Lakes will keep rain to the south Wednesday before transporting hot, summery air north for the end of the week.

Rain is starting Wednesday morning just south of the Finger Lakes across northern Pennsylvania along a warm front. High pressure just north of Lake Ontario will act as a block to prevent the front, and any rain, from making any progress  to the north. Instead, the rain will slide off to the east and dissipate this morning, keeping the Finger Lakes dry.

By this afternoon, enough dry air should become entrenched over the Finger Lakes that the sun will come out, especially for areas in the northern half of the Finger Lakes. High temperatures should rise into the low and even mid 70s for these areas. Further south, where it will be harder to get the sun out, temperatures will be in the upper 60s and low 70s.

South of the warm front, temperatures will soar well into the 80s across the Ohio River Valley this afternoon. As high pressure slides east, clockwise flow around the high will begin to push that heat north while keeping the Finger Lakes dry.

Temperatures will rise into mid and upper 70s on Thursday, with low and mid 80s Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Our next chance for precipitation will come towards Sunday and Monday as a cold front approaches slowly from the northwest. Some showers and thunderstorms may accompany the front, but severe weather seems unlikely with light winds at all levels of the atmosphere.

One final thing to note in the forecast- Thursday morning may turn out quite foggy across our region, so it may be a good idea to plan a few extra minutes into your commute tomorrow morning.

Meteorologist Drew Montreuil
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Meteorologist Drew Montreuil has been forecasting the weather in the Finger Lakes region since 2006 and has degrees in meteorology from SUNY Oswego (B.S. with Honors) and Cornell (M.S.).

When not forecasting, he can be found working at the local library, making goat milk soap, running until his legs burn, or playing with his three young boys.