Blizzard continues southeast of Finger Lakes

The Blizzard of 2016 continues Saturday morning from Washington DC into New York City and Long Island.
The Blizzard of 2016 continues Saturday morning from Washington DC into New York City and Long Island.

As expected, a major blizzard striking the Mid-Atlantic region is staying south and east of the Finger Lakes.

This storm system will continue to dump snow at rates over 2 inches per hourĀ  as it slowly moves off to the north and east. The precipitation has made is at as far north and west as it will. The Finger Lakes will remain dry as a result.

As this nor’easter moves out to sea today, high pressure over the Midwest will quickly move in to take its place. While much of Saturday will turn out cloudy, there should be a good deal of sunshine on Sunday.

Temperatures will get a bit warmer thanks to the sunshine as well. While highs on Saturday will be stuck mostly in the low 20s, highs Sunday will reach the mid and upper 20s.

This warming trend will continue on Monday as southerly winds increase ahead of a weak storm system. Clouds will thicken up on Monday, but highs should reach the mid 30s.

The weak system will swing through on Tuesday with a few scattered rain showers. These will turn to snow as some lake effect tries to organize southeast of the Great Lakes on Wednesday.

Often times, when a major snow storm impacts the northeast, the hype machine gets busy looking for the next storm. With that in mind, a buzz is already being generated for late next week. While the models, even 5 or 6 days out, were all in basic agreement with this blizzard, they are all over the place for any storm potential next week.

At this time, I am watching the pattern for its potential, but not putting any stock in any individual model runs. Don’t buy into any hype until Monday at the earliest, if even then.

Meteorologist Drew Montreuil
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Meteorologist Drew Montreuil has been forecasting the weather in the Finger Lakes region since 2006 and has degrees in meteorology from SUNY Oswego (B.S. with Honors) and Cornell (M.S.) When not forecasting, he can be found working at the local library, making soap, or playing with his two young boys.